kyphosis thoracolumbar

cheenaharry
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08/23/2017 - 1:50pm
kyphosis thoracolumbar

Hello,
I read the book and was delighted by all the wonderful pictures of beautiful people and their beautiful postures! i've tried all the exercises, but the main block i seem to have is that I can keep my back 'straight' when sitting, especially when sitting on the ground - i cannot sit on the ground or in a chair (although it is less extreme in a chair) without my back rounding, particularly at T12 where I understand the psoas, trapezius, solar plexus and diaphragm all meet/attach. it has been this way since my earliest memories at 6 or 7 years old. i was in dance and did intense stretching but was not able to ever gain more flexibility. i feel that the psoas muscle is the block, or this lumbodorsal junction and kyphosis is the block. has anyone dealt with this issue?  the kyphosis appear to be postural...the spine bones seem to be intact with reasonable disc space after taking x-rays and working with some local practitioners.

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6 hours 32 min ago
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07/05/2009 - 7:54am

Hello Cheena,

Great to hear you like the book, and that you are putting it into practice. Dont be too hard on yourself. If your back has been rounded for a long time. it will take time to gradually reduce the rounding.  When we sit well, maybe for the first time in many years, reducing the unhealthy curve in the lower back it often shows up how curved the upper back is - T12 is often particularly affected by a strong "S" or "C" shape in the spine.  

That was my experience a few years ago when I took the Gokhale Method Foundations course myself. Gradually stretch sitting, stretchlying on my back, then stack sitting (as it became more and more comfortable), has all reduced this  unwanted curve. Shoulder rolls are a good place to start.

The psoas loves the natural home a healthy "J" spine gives it.  Other spinal shapes tend to trigger chronic tension. To work with this maybe a 2 stage approach would be helpful. Give your psoas a nice rest each day stretch lying on your back with ample support under the legs. If the psoas is in chronic spasm a warm bath or shower, as appropriate, can help it find some initial ease.  Longer term encouraging the bones back into a natural architecture gets to the root of the problem - hip hinging and glide walking become very healthy experiences for the psoas - if it is currently challenged go easy, take a "less is more" approach.  (Much as I have come to love the lunge stretch in the appendix of the "8 Steps to a Pain Free Back" book it might be too much too soon just now.) Working on your own from a book go easy and let comfort be the measure. If you get a chance to get hands on instruction from a Gokhale Method teacher that would a great next step. Hope this helps

John

 

 

 

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